Cat Man, Black Man, Wow

Wakanda Forever, to think I’m a black man that doesn’t like my people most of the time but this movie was a fun time in every sense. Though I am not one of the blind followers, but who’s reading, just see Black Panther. “Cat Man, Black Man, Wow”

I’m not sure there is enough praise, from astounding to zen-like for Black Panther and I choose wow. How could I do this movie justice and would it not be adding my admiration to the chorus of so many others? I could also go for all the drama and ideology from some regarding this movie and let me start by saying that just being an African American man has nothing to do with it and I can’t call myself a comic book nerd, just saying.

If anything as much as Chadwick Boseman and Michael B. Jordan did in this movie, you have to give it up for the ladies; sexy, seductive, and sensational, and personally, I’m having a hard time deciding between Lupita Nyong’o as Nakia and Letitia Wright as Shuri. Bring everybody to see this kid-friendly but enough to keep a grown man on the edge of his seat not to mention all of the stunningly beautiful visuals. As for the “Tolkien White Guys,” they were superb as well though there is one significantly glaring aspect that I think everyone is ignoring but what can I say Wakanda Forever.

Okay Fandango has been appeased so let me get a little more real with the rest of you, first and foremost I’m not your typical black guy, the only other Chadwick Boseman film I’ve seen is Marshall, and that’s because I got free tickets. I saw Captain America: Civil War because of all the hype surrounding it but Black Panther I’ve been excited about since the announcement came around. I don’t find myself agreeing with “my people” half the time, my whole life I haven’t been black enough but that’s another story, and finally, Black Panther gets one of his own, nearly devoid of other heroes, end credits, stay put.

Again there were plenty of heroes in the whole life of Wakanda, dare I say one too many maybe but I’m getting to that, but in all, I’m proud both as an African American, a Marvel fan, and just a moviegoer, I saw it twice. In case you’ve been under a rock, Black Panther is the story of the newly crowned king of the futuristic African nation Wakanda, T’Challa/Black Panther.

That right there blew me away which is indeed a sad fact, since the reason we want kids to go out and see this movie is the portrayal of positive black role models and showing a side of Africa even fictional that shows greatness and nobility. It’s a thin line considering how depictions of Africa are often but to add this incredible sci-fi universe and continue to embrace the traditions of the people and continent, incorporating all of it together.

As I am with the ladies, which battle I found more epic has me split. The ritual fight scenes and environments, yes CG but it didn’t matter I was mesmerized, and those fights might have been more incredible than Black Panther’s suit no offense. The Casino scene though, a great battle but just the idea of three black individuals and not that it hasn’t shown up before but T’Challa, Nakia, and Okoye just pounding away on a bunch of criminals, no suit, no guns, and no freaking mercy. Now the final fight and oh yes spoiler alert that’s what took me out of the movie a bit though and I can’t say this enough, but it was astounding and with a humorous moment or two.

There was plenty to laugh at most of the jokes were on point, maybe one or two just today’s pop culture such as “what are those” and the video Shuri was recording that you know would end up on YouTube. I think I’m starting to decide more on Shuri now, funny, intelligent, hot as Hell, though I know many women will side more with Danai Gurira/Okoye for her strength, I swear is there anything that Danai Gurira can’t do, guns, swords, spear, etc. I can’t leave the quiet moments out with Angela Bassett/ Ramonda/Queen Mother trying to protect both of her children Shuri and T’Challa or how about Daniel Kaluuya/ W’Kabi, Winston Duke/ M’Baku, there was not one single bad performance in this film honestly.

There were lessons to, that I think some might miss based only on race, for example, Wakanda’s policies reminded me of this America First mentality, and that the youth can and will lead, and how can one man be free if all men are not free. Personally, I saw myself siding with Erik Killmonger for most of the film, maybe he didn’t have the best ideas to “save the world,” but he made his points.

Now, this is where the rubber meets the road I have two facts that need to be made clear, the first isn’t so terrible but the second is going to make a lot of people mad like that’s anything new. Just know I truly enjoyed this film, I plan on getting it as soon as it’s available, hell speaking of points I could see it (without 3D) for free, and I paid twice. Also if you don’t want any spoilers, time to turn away and I might make someone mad.

My first point which isn’t much, black on black violence, a usual talking point for the alt-right and no I’m not talking about the ritual combat which I found to be exhilarating, heroic, and noble; I mean the civil war. In a movie that has brought about so much black unity in reality, that showed 4 out of five tribes in Africa united there still was a war, Black Panther and Killmonger were one thing, but again it’s demonstrated that black people all over can’t get along because of our differences. Now King T’Challa at the United Nations pushed for unity across the globe which was one of the best lessons, but I wonder about the battle of the three tribes is it just forgotten?

Okay, the highest point is the final battle the objective was to keep Wakanda’s weapons from getting out, Black Panther had to reclaim the throne in the long run I understand, those that sided with Killmonoger needed to be defeated and hello ladies. The thing is who was stopping the weapons, who was “saving the world,” who risked himself and fulfilled the primary objective… survey says; Martin Freeman/ Everett K. Ross, the white man. Just once, just one freaking time I want any minority to save the world, to protect themselves without a white man playing the pivotal role, and I’m sure there is some movie that it’s happened but ladies and gentlemen this is not it, despite my praise.

Everyone was playing there role I understand Shuri wanting to fight alongside her brother, Nakia and her love, Okoye and her troops but seeing as how they left the Queen Mother, hell give Angela Basset something to do with it. In all a fabulous movie by Marvel, allow me to sound like a little kid and say I want to be Black Panther, okay more like Killmonger, so Wakanda Forever, Cat Man, Black Man, Wow.

“Marshall” Law… Fine With Me

We all fear “Martial” law I suppose but this movie is nothing to be concerned with unless you have kids and you’re looking for a date night, educational but hilarious and so much more. “Marshall” Law… Fine With Me, or maybe, “Friedman Law”.

Actually, it was more than fine with me, it’s quite amazing to be sure, incredible, well worth the watch, kudos all around for the cast. I wasn’t skeptical or anything but let’s just say I wasn’t in a rush to see it but I would definitely go and see it again it has a little bit of everything to be sure making one well-done story.

From Chadwick Boseman, to Josh Gad, and Kate Hudson, though out of the three, Josh Gad really made this movie, though since it’s based on a true story I don’t know whether to say that Boseman really helped Gad to shine or if that’s just how it was between the real Marshall and Friedman in reality. As with Kate Hudson, I’m tempted to call her role cliché but it was awesome to see how well she took to it, though the ending was somewhat subdued for my taste. There is more than enough action to keep up with all the legal jargon, though with some of that action I wouldn’t necessarily recommend this as an educational tool for the kids.

So that’s enough for “Fandango” overall I like a movie that’s able to stimulate, motivate, and educate all in one; it’s films like this that sort of show me why perhaps my father ‘had’ such high hopes for me and for himself. I can’t help but wonder if the real Thurgood Marshall was such a badass, again based on a true story and just like any of the books I read you just have to know how much is on point. If I learned anything besides, some lawyer talk and of course how bad things were back then for the record, women are nothing but trouble, I’m half-way kidding maybe.

“’Cause white women
don’t bring nothin’ but trouble.

That ain’t white women, man.
That’s women.” Save The Last Dance (2001)

Honestly, I didn’t have any inclination to just go and see this movie, “Regal Crown Club” knows how to take care of its members but anyway right after the movie I was telling a friend how awesome it is. Considering this day and age I believe this movie says plenty, I almost couldn’t believe the correlation between yesteryear and today.

As far as plot, again I would usually say that this movie might feed of something like the 1997 film “Rosewood” but if anything it shows that the more things change the more they stay the same throughout history, can’t go lynching a town but that’s only a span of 1923 to around 1940 if I’m remembering the timeframe. Now I also joked about women but other than Kate Hudson who you’re supposed to hate as a character the other female roles and supporting cast were top notch and astounding.

In case the trailer didn’t give it away, “Eleanor Strubing” (Kate Hudson) frames a black man for rape and attempted murder, and it’s up to Thurgood Marshall and an extremely reluctant Sam Friedman to defend him. I’m sure some people might be somewhat disappointed since this isn’t the Chadwick talking so much loud and proud against the state he truly has to play off Josh for that but it comes out well. Maybe I’m an idiot for not seeing the truth until the end but that’s refreshing when your audience has to think and has to imagine what comes next.

Keesha Sharp and Marina Squerciati who played Marshall and Friedman’s wives respectively did quite well for what screen time they received. I wish I could remember that one woman though, who led the jury, I don’t want to risk sounding stupider but the way she and Josh played off each other, was smoking. Speaking of smoking the rest of the cast made my blood boil but in a good way and the scenes between Kate and Sterling K. Brown were done well to be sure.

Another reason you might not want to bring the kids is the language, not that it’s over the top, it’s used exactly where it’s needed but still, it’s there. The movie itself isn’t offensive but it will give African Americans and Jewish Americans something to bond over, that’s a fact.

Now if you don’t want any spoilers, I advise you turn back now with my five out of five-star blessing because these are just too good not to share. Am I making this movie sound perfect, it’s not bad at all though there are a few things I would have done differently, of course, this is history so there’s that.

“If there is absolutely no way you can get out of taking a terrible beating, the only sensible thing to do is, get in the first lick!” Billy Jack, The Trial of Billy Jack (1974)

Josh Gad made me proud when he knew he was going to get beat up but swung first and usually something like that isn’t funny but when he was expecting round two, he picked up a knife at home which his wife promptly took and handed him a bigger butcher knife (Wife Goals). Chadwick Boseman did his share of fighting and the quips he and Josh shared were excellent, even when he was forced to remain silent and speak through Gad. Of course, there was the verdict and the passing glances between the forewoman on the jury her and Gad, and Strubing and Spell, sort of reminisce of “Life” 1999

Yes, I was one of those disappointed people who expected Marshall to be all fire and brimstone but he had to work through Friedman nearly the entire time. The ending sort of just petered out, we didn’t get to see what happened to Strubing, was the whole synagogue scene just to drive the point that Friedman was Jewish and Marshall just walking off talking about dinner and the next case. I am impressed though with this one fact, that just like today, a white man commits a crime and he’s a pillar of the community he’s a good person, but a black man will have every sin dug up to villainize him, guilty or innocent.

Five stars, a great movie, if the true story of Rosewood was too hard to stomach Marshall will fit the bill with a happy ending. One more thing, just a note, I like Common and all, he and John Legend were awesome with the song “Glory” but the theme song for Marshall while decent, it’s not Glory, but anyway, this movie truly is glory honestly.